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"Embracing Justice" The Archbishop of Canterbury's Lent Book 2022 - Isabelle Hamley

"Embracing Justice" The Archbishop of Canterbury's Lent Book 2022 - Isabelle Hamley

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Embracing Justice, the Archbishop of Canterbury's Lent Book for 2022 asks: What might a spirituality shaped by biblical portrayals of justice look like for the church of the 21st century?

What is justice? It’s a question we encounter everywhere in life and that over the last years has increasingly demanded an answer.

In the Archbishop of Canterbury’s Lent Book for 2022, Isabelle Hamley invites us on an exhilarating journey through Scripture to discover how we, as churches, communities and individual Christians, can seek and practice justice even when enmeshed in such a fractured world.

Full of practical encouragement, Embracing Justice brilliantly weaves together biblical texts, diverse voices, contemporary stories, and personal and group meditations to reveal liberating and imaginative ways in which me may grow in discipleship – and more fully reflect the justice, mercy and compassion of Christ in our lives.

With six chapters to take you from Ash Wednesday to Easter Sunday, this Lent devotional for 2022 is essential reading for anyone interested in the issues of justice – from climate and economic justice to gender and racial equality – that are increasingly at the forefront of global consciousness, and the role that Christians and the Church must play in them.

Suitable for use both as a single study for individuals and for small groups to prepare for Easter, Embracing Justice will encourage, inform and motivate anyone looking for Christian books about justice. It will help you understand justice from a biblical perspective, and inspire you to seek it in every aspect of your life.

Although the world is broken, unequal and violent, the call to reflect God’s own justice and mercy continues to sound like a steady drumbeat, impossible to ignore. Company with Isabelle Hamley this Lent, and discover that we can all join God’s mission of transformation and embrace his justice.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Isabelle Hamley is Theological Adviser to the House of Bishops and was formerly Chaplain to the Archbishop of Canterbury. She has long been concerned with questions of justice, mercy and restoration, having been a probation officer before ordination and ministering subsequently amidst the diversity of parish life. Her books include The Bible and Mental Health (2020), which she edited with Christopher C. H. Cook, and Unspeakable Things Spoken (2019). Embracing Justice is her first Lent book.
PRESS REVIEWS

At last, an authoritative and comprehensive study of the connection between faith and mental health which doesn’t shy away from making helpful practical applications. I commend it very warmly indeed.

- Bishop James Newcome on ‘The Bible and Mental Health’ edited by Isabelle Hamley and Christopher C H Cook

Full of insight, intellectually robust, and consistently honest about the fragile spaces we inhabit, its authors explore from multiple angles how God can be present within frailty, not beyond it.

- The Revd Dr Alison J Gray, FRCPsych on ‘The Bible and Mental Health’ edited by Isabelle Hamley and Christopher C H Cook

Full of insight, intellectually robust, and consistently honest about the fragile spaces we inhabit, its authors explore from multiple angles how God can be present within frailty, not beyond it.

- John M.G. Barclay FBA on ‘The Bible and Mental Health’ edited by Isabelle Hamley and Christopher C H Cook

A wonderful analysis . . . balanced, incisive and readable. I hope the author writes more - both about Irigaray and scripture.

- Amazon review of ‘Unspeakable Things Unspoken: An Irigarayan Reading of Otherness and Victimization in Judges’

Superb study. A deeply challenging and richly argued analysis of a difficult text of scripture. It makes a strong argument for how and why this text should not be avoided.

- Amazon review of ‘Unspeakable Things Unspoken: An Irigarayan Reading of Otherness and Victimization in Judges’